New words – 17 June 2019

Westend61 / Getty

superager noun [C]
UK /suː.pər.ˈeɪ.dʒəʳ/ US /suː.pɚ.ˈeɪ.dʒɚ/
someone over the age of 65 whose memory and thinking skills are similar to those of someone in their 20s

Her advice is based on a study of “superagers”, individuals 65 years or older, whose cognitive skills are as acute as the average 25-year-old. Barrett believes that what sets superagers apart is their ability to use the unpleasant feelings they experience when challenging themselves as a signal to keep going, rather than as a warning to stop and rest.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 10 July 2018]

silver striver noun [C]
UK /sɪl.və.ˈstraɪvəʳ/ US /sɪl.vɚ.ˈstraɪvɚ/
someone who continues to work after they have passed the typical retirement age

Peter Stanway, 72, is helping to design a block of flats overlooking the zebra crossing that appears on the cover of the Beatles’ Abbey Road. Although he started drawing his state pension at 70, he still works between 30 and 50 hours a week and has no plans to retire until he is 80. Stanway … is part of a new demographic — the silver strivers. These are the baby boomers who, when they reached state pension age, simply kept on working.
[Sunday Times, 11 March 2018]

grey tsunami noun [S]
/greɪ.tsuːˈnɑː.mi/
the high number of elderly people in the world in the 21st century, caused by people living longer and by the “baby boomer” generation now reaching old age

We have been warned, for years, of a so-called “grey tsunami” that is about to crash into our society. … This represents a challenge for hospitals, nursing homes and families. And it comes with significant costs. Describing this demographic shift as a “grey tsunami” — with its terrifying image of a monstrous wave poised to break over our heads — is striking and urgent.
[www.cba.ca, 15 October 2017]

About new words

New words – 10 June 2019

Paul Bradbury / Caiaimage / Getty

cleanstagrammer noun [C]
UK /ˈkliːn.stə.græm.əʳ/ US /ˈkliːn.stə.græm.ɚ/
someone who posts advice and tips about housework and cleaning on the Instagram social media site

Twelve years on, Bray, 37, is better known as “The Organised Mum” to her 142,000 Instagram followers, and part of the cleanstagrammer boom sweeping across social media. Where Instagram was once full of clean-eating gurus showcasing their latest green smoothie, it’s now full of cleaning influencers … showcasing the genius cleaning hacks behind their sparkling homes.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 1 March 2019]

sponcon noun [U]
UK /ˈspɒn.kɒn/ US /ˈspɑːn.kɑːn/
abbreviation for sponsored content: posts on social media sites such as Instagram where the poster is being paid by a company to promote its product

When done correctly, sponcon is mutually beneficial to the reader, the brand, and the influencer. With the added transparency of how much influencers can make (take a look at Zoe Sugg’s net worth, if you want to make yourself feel really bad!) it’s no wonder teenagers and young adults are intrigued by what they can do with their own social platforms.
[www.found.co.uk, 15 February 2019]

outfluencer noun [C]
UK /ˈaʊt.ˌflu.ən.səʳ/ US /ˈaʊt.ˌflu.ən.sɚ/
an influencer (someone who uses their social media posts to change the way that other people behave or the things they buy) who posts about outdoor adventure, extreme sport, etc.

Reached peak influencer? Start following some outfluencers – what we’re calling the digital answer to Bear Grylls. You’ll find them catching waves, scaling precarious rockfaces and hurtling themselves from any fixed structure. Live (vicariously) on the edge.
[Women’s Health (UK), January/February 2019]

About new words

New words – 3 June 2019

Hill Street Studios /
DigitalVision / Getty Images Plus

EGOT noun [C or U]
UK /ˈiː .gɒt/ US /ˈiː.gɑːt/
the achievement of winning an Emmy (TV), a Grammy (music), an Oscar (film), and a Tony (theatre), the four major entertainment awards

Composer Richard Rogers was the first to achieve EGOT status in 1962 with his Emmy for the original music he composed for television’s “Winston Churchill: The Valiant Years,” starting a tradition of composers being among the most frequent kinds of entertainment professionals to win all four awards. Actors and producers have also historically been better positioned to complete an EGOT collection.
[www.cnbc.com, 21 February 2019]

sadcom noun [C]
UK /ˈsæd.kɒm/ US /ˈsæd.kɑːm/
a type of sitcom (a funny television or radio show in which the same characters appear in each episode) that uses humour to deal with serious themes

It’s perhaps surprising, then, that series four has seen the show delve ever further into sadcom territory – popularised by the likes of Master of None, Bojack Horseman and Fleabag – as it increasingly examines the difficulties its protagonists face rather than playing up their ineptitude for lols.
[www.theguardian.com, 19 September 2017]

slow TV noun [U]
UK /ˌsləʊ.tiːˈviː/ US /ˌsloʊ.tiːˈviː/
a genre of TV programmes that usually last for several hours and show an ordinary event, such as a train journey, taking place in real time, designed to be relaxing for the viewer

Slow TV is a wildly successful phenomenon in its home country of Norway and it’s something we can totally see exploding in popularity here in the States. Essentially, Norwegian television crews strap cameras to various forms of transportation or insert them into activities and record hours-long programs. There’s no plot, cast, or season premieres and finales. Yet millions of people tune in to watch.
[coolmaterial.com, no date]

About new words

New words – 27 May 2019

Andriy Onufriyenko / Moment / Getty

algocracy noun [U]
UK /ˌæl.ˈgɒk.rə.si/ US /ˌæl.ˈgɑː.krə.si/
a social system where people are governed and important decisions are made by computer algorithms

Robots could use vast amounts of data and an insidious knowledge of ways to manipulate human behaviour to effectively take over vast swathes of our lives in what would effectively become rule by algorithm, or an ‘algocracy’, the head of the City watchdog has warned.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 11 July 2018]

cyberdefender noun [C]
UK /ˈsaɪ.bə.dɪfen.dəʳ/ US /ˈsaɪ.bɚ.dɪfen.dɚ/
a person who takes actions to protect a workplace from cybercrime (=crime or illegal activity that is done using the internet)

To build the best line of defense for your business, you need to take a communal approach to your cybersecurity strategy. Cybercrime is modern crime; there is no silver bullet. That’s why everybody within your company needs to be a cyberdefender.
[www.business.com, 1 November 2018]

Silicon Gorge noun [U]
UK /ˌsɪl.ɪ.kən.ˈgɔːdʒ/ US /ˌsɪl.ɪ.kən.ˈgɔːrdʒ/
a region in the southwest of England, specifically the area around the city of Bristol, where numerous tech companies are located

California may be able to boast of Silicon Valley, but in a (not so) quiet corner of southwest England lies … Silicon Gorge. Home to a growing number of exciting Bristol startups, this zone of commercial enterprise is fast becoming an aspirational hotspot for tech wizards and ambitious business leaders alike.
[www.ignite.digital, 15 September 2017]

About new words

New words – 20 May 2019

Tom Eversley / EyeEm / Getty

blood avocado noun [C]
UK /ˌblʌd.æv.əˈkɑː.dəʊ/ US /ˌblʌd.æv.əˈkɑː.doʊ/
an avocado that has been grown in an area controlled by a drug cartel (=a criminal group that produces illegal drugs) and that forces farmers to give that group a percentage of their income from growing the fruit

Avocado on toast might be off the menu. British and Irish restaurants are increasingly ditching them over concerns that Latin American imports are damaging the environment and funding Mexican drug cartels. Growers in Michoacán, west Mexico, have had their land seized by drug lords who are reported to be earning £150m a year by selling the so-called ‘blood avocados’ to British traders.
[The Guardian, 10 December 2018]

coffee name noun [C]
UK /ˈkɒf.i.neɪm/ US /ˈkɑː.fi.neɪm/
a name you give when ordering a coffee or in similar situations because it is easier to pronounce or spell than your real name

Ordering a morning coffee in a busy café can be difficult for anyone, but it becomes especially difficult when you have a name baristas seem unable to understand. Many people opt for a ‘coffee name’, usually a short Anglo-Saxon name like Jack or Jess, or an Anglo-Saxon name that sounds similar to their real non-Anglo-Saxon name. The idea of a coffee name is not unique to Australia, with social media posts of mangled names being shared by coffee lovers in the United States and United Kingdom.
[www.sbs.com.au, 12 January 2016]

chrono-nutrition noun [U]
UK /ˌkrɒn.ə.njuːˈtrɪʃ.ᵊn/ US /ˌkrɒn.ə.nuːˈtrɪʃ.ᵊn/
a way of eating based on the theory that when we eat, as well as what we eat, has an important influence on our health

Chrono-nutrition is an evolving and developing field of science which is beginning to show how our ancient biology is in conflict with our modern lifestyle. The mechanisms behind why time of eating may influence health are not entirely clear.
[Medical Research Council, mrc.ukri.org, 19 June 2018]

About new words

New words – 13 May 2019

courtneyk / E+ / Getty Images

generation scroll noun [U]
UK /ˌdʒen.əˈreɪ.ʃən.ˈskrəʊl/ US /ˌdʒen.əˈreɪ.ʃən.ˈskroʊl/
a way of referring to the generation of people who watch TV, read news, etc. mostly on a computer or mobile phone

This 25th annual analysis of media habits, based on a survey of 2,000 young people, says this is now ‘generation scroll’ – in which most viewing is through mobile internet devices, whether a phone, laptop or tablet computer. Only 10% now get ‘almost all’ their TV programmes through a TV screen.
[www.bbc.co.uk/news, 30 January 2019]

textavism noun [U]
/ˈtekst.ə.vɪ.zᵊm/
the use of text messages to try to persuade people to act in a way that will achieve a particular result, usually a political or social one

In the past year, text activism, or textavism, has consumed nearly all of Butler’s limited spare time … It often involves sending text messages to voters in swing states. ‘We try to apply pressure where we can do the most good’, Butler said. Recently, in the course of twenty-four hours, texters from MoveOn, where Butler volunteers, sent more than two million messages urging registered Democrats to vote in November.
[www.newyorker.com, 5 November 2018]

sadfishing noun [U]
/ˈsæd.fɪʃ.ɪŋ/
the practice of writing about one’s unhappiness or emotional problems on social media, especially in a vague way, in order to attract attention and sympathetic responses

You’ll have seen sadfishing happening on Facebook. Any time someone puts ‘I’m just so done with all this’ as their Facebook status without any explanation and then replies to anyone who asks a follow question with ‘I’ll PM you’: that’s sadfishing. If you’re a supermodel and influencer from the Hollywood Hills then sadfishing will make you money in #sponcon.
[www.metro.co.uk, 21 January 2019]

About new words

New words – 6 May 2019

Caiaimage / Paul Bradbury / Caiaimage / Getty

FIRE noun [U]
UK /ˈfaɪəʳ/ US /faɪr/
abbreviation for financial independence, retire early: a way of life that involves working hard and saving as much money as possible during your 20s and 30s in order to be able to retire when you are in your 40s

The ‘retire early’ part of this movement can be something of a misnomer. Many FIRE devotees don’t plan to spend 50 years playing bridge or taking leisure cruises. Instead, the focus is on financial independence: the aim is to save enough of a nest-egg, and live simply enough, so that the ensuing decades can be spent doing something other than chasing payrises and promotions at a corporate job, or worrying about owing the bank a large mortgage.
[www.bbc.co.uk, 2 November 2018]

disloyalty bonus noun [C]
UK /ˌdɪsˈlɔɪ.əl.ti.bəʊ.nəs/ US /ˌdɪsˈlɔɪ.əl.ti.boʊ.nəs/
a salary increase gained through changing to a new job rather than staying in your old one, where salaries for existing workers tend not to increase at the same rate

Workers who choose to stay in their jobs rather than move are missing out on a ‘disloyalty bonus’, a new report suggests. The Resolution Foundation found pay growth has hit 10% for those who change jobs, while those who remain in their posts received a pay rise of just 2.5%.
[news.sky.com, 2 August 2018]

flexism noun [U]
/ˈflek.sɪ.zəm/
discrimination against someone who has flexible working hours

“What I’m really trying to do with the term ‘flexism’ is take out the sexism part of flexibility. It’s not about being discriminated for working flexibly because you’re a woman or a mom. It’s about being discriminated for working flexibly full-stop. Until we make flexibility available to everyone for any reason, we’re going to continue to see flexism in the workforce.”
[www.officespacesoftware.com, 22 June 2018]

About new words

New words – 29 April 2019

jacoblund / iStock / Getty Images Plus

HIIS noun [U]
/hɪs/
abbreviation for high-intensity interval skipping: physical training that consists of short periods of intense skipping with short periods of rest in between

Forget HIIT, HIIS … is likely to become a big fitness trend in 2019. The exercise, involving short, sharp bursts of skipping, is one of the many ways that the Victoria’s Secret Angels keep in shape, as you can burn up to 1200 calories in a session.
[www.harpersbazaar.com, 14 December 2018]

fitness snacking noun [U]
/ˈfɪt.nəs.snæk.ɪŋ/
keeping fit by doing very short periods of physical activity regularly

British celebrity personal trainer Matt Roberts recently told The Telegraph that ongoing spurts of physical activity can help prevent illnesses associated with sedentary lifestyles, like heart disease and diabetes. The fitness expert said that not enough people get the daily exercise they need, and ‘fitness snacking’ is an approach that helps folks incorporate physical activity in a manageable way.
[globalnews.ca, 1 October 2018]

immersive yoga noun [U]
UK /ɪˈmɜː.sɪv.ˈjəʊ.gə/ US /ɪˈmɝː.sɪv.ˈjoʊ.gə/
a type of yoga accompanied by relaxing sounds and images

The city’s immersive yoga trend feeds into a wider, global movement. New York’s Woom Centre, for example, offers classes complete with sound therapy, blindfolded segments, essential oils and a gulp of a “fresh elixir” shot, while Humming Puppy in Melbourne, Sydney and NYC pipes sound at supposedly healing frequencies into the studio.
[www.eventbrite.com, 20 June 2018]

About new words

New words – 22 April 2019

fahnurjingga / iStock / Getty Images Plus

shrobing noun [U]
UK /ˈʃrəʊ.bɪŋ/ US /ˈʃroʊ.bɪŋ/
wearing a coat around one’s shoulders (from the words shoulder and robing)

Be prepared to go hands-free: There’s no shoulder left to hang a handbag on, so it’s about going it alone with an iPhone and credit card and making the most of utility pockets. Shrobing also demands an assortment of plush polo necks to drive away the cold – the tighter the better to keep the neck looking elongated rather than swaddled.
[Vogue UK, 24 February 2017]

lampshading noun [U]
/ˈlæmp.ʃeɪdɪŋ/
wearing a baggy top or short dress with bare legs and sometimes boots

Ariana Grande has apparently resumed her role as resident fashion inspiration. The pop star … has reportedly brought her trend of lampshading to the masses. According to a report from Lyst, the year’s biggest fashion trend was oversized hoodies, and we all have Ariana to thank. The singer – who frequently coordinates her sweatshirts with knee-high boots – was the source of a 130% increase in searches for oversized hoodies.
[www.teenvogue.com, 27 December 2018]

jarfing noun [U]
UK /ˈdʒɑː.fɪŋ/ US /ˈdʒɑːr.fɪŋ/
wearing a jumper (UK) or sweater (US) wrapped around one’s neck and shoulders (from the words jumper and scarf)

The Sunday Times Style reckons that jarfing is heating up as a trend, and celebs and fashion people have been spotted wearing the look, so it’s officially a thing. … Does jarfing put your favourite jumper at risk of stretching out and being ruined forevermore? For sure. But isn’t that the fun of fashion – ignoring an item of clothing expressly made for the purpose of keeping your neck warm in favour of a trend that looks and feels ridiculous?
[Metro, 31 October 2018]

About new words

New words – 15 April 2019

Naila Ruechel / DigitalVision / GettyImages

vegetable butcher noun [C]
UK /ˈvedʒ.tə.bᵊl.ˌbʊtʃ.əʳ/ US /ˈvedʒ.tə.bᵊl.ˌbʊtʃ.ɚ/
a person who prepares vegetables in a shop

But these days butchery need not involve meat at all, as Harrods has unveiled a new “vegetable butcher” as part of its extended foodhall. … Just like regular butchers, so-called vegetable butchers stand behind glass counters, offer before-your-eyes precision chopping, and can concoct the perfect seasoning for every dish.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 1 November 2018]

planetary health diet noun [U]
UK /ˌplæn.ɪ.tər.i.ˈhelθ.daɪ.ət/ US /ˌplæn.ɪ.ter.i.ˈhelθ.daɪ.ət/
a way of eating that aims to give everyone in the world enough food to eat without damaging the planet

A diet has been developed that promises to save lives, feed 10 billion people and all without causing catastrophic damage to the planet. Scientists have been trying to figure out how we are going to feed billions more people in the decades to come. Their answer – ‘the planetary health diet’ – does not completely banish meat and dairy. But it requires an enormous shift in what we pile onto our plates and turning to foods that we barely eat.
[www.bbc.co.uk/news, 17 January 2019]

LALS noun [abbr]
/læls/
abbreviation for low-alcohol, low-sugar, used to refer to a type of food or drink, or a way of eating, that contains little or no alcohol or sugar

Our tip for 2019? Watch out for the ‘No-groni’ – the LALS cousin of the Negroni (equal parts gin, campari and sweet vermouth), named ‘cocktail of the year’ by Petersham Nurseries in London. The No-groni contains the non-alcoholic versions of each spirit, and doesn’t contain a drop of the hangover.
[www.afr.com, 17 December 2018]

About new words