Dips, slumps, growth and peaks: talking about data (2)

Sasirin Pamai/EyeEm/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

Last month, I spoke about general words connected with data. This post covers ways of talking about what we can see from data, particularly when numbers increase, decrease or remain the same. For anyone doing IELTS, this should be useful vocabulary to learn!

Continue reading “Dips, slumps, growth and peaks: talking about data (2)”

Gathering, compiling and analyzing: talking about data (1)

Laurence Dutton/E+/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

Has there ever been a time when we’ve been so dependent on data? All over the world, people are anxiously looking at graphs and charts tracking the progress of Covid-19. In this, the first of two posts, I look at the language associated with the word data itself. My next post will cover words and phrases used to describe what the data shows. While this language is particularly relevant at the moment, I hope you will find it generally useful too.

Continue reading “Gathering, compiling and analyzing: talking about data (1)”

No smoke without fire: proverbs in English (3)

mrPliskin/E+/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

I have recently written two posts about proverbs, but there are so many more incredibly useful and common ones, I decided to write one more! It is difficult to choose from a long list of lovely, colourful phrases, but I believe that every reasonably advanced learner of English needs to know the ones that follow.

Continue reading “No smoke without fire: proverbs in English (3)”

Same old same old: talking about things that don’t change

Art Wolfe/Mint Images RF/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

Whilst writing about proverbs (see previous posts), I came across the phrase ‘A leopard doesn’t change its spots’, which means that a bad person never changes their character. That set me thinking about other ways of talking about people or things that don’t change.

Continue reading “Same old same old: talking about things that don’t change”

Don’t count your chickens: proverbs in English (2)

Stephen Simpson/DigitalVision/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

In my last post, I introduced a few proverbs that are common in English, especially in conversations. In this one, I am going to look at some common uses of proverbs: to give warnings, to criticize, and to comfort people. I mentioned last month that some proverbs are so well-known that we often use only the first part. Where this is the case, I will show the part that can be omitted in brackets.

Continue reading “Don’t count your chickens: proverbs in English (2)”

Fools rush in: proverbs in English (1)

Izumi T/Moment/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

Proverbs may seem rather old-fashioned or strange but when I started thinking about writing this post, I was amazed to realize how many of them are in common use. They serve as a convenient shorthand for something that would often be more complicated to say in a different way. We frequently use them at the end of a conversation to sum up what has been said, and many of them are so familiar that we can omit part of the phrase and still understand what is meant.

Continue reading “Fools rush in: proverbs in English (1)”

Quarantine, carriers and face masks: the language of the coronavirus

d3sign/Moment/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

As coronavirus (officially called COVID-19) continues to dominate the news, I thought it might be useful to look at some of the language we use to talk about it. Regular readers will know my obsession with collocations (word partners), and there are lots of good ones in this topic, most of which can be applied to other diseases too. Continue reading “Quarantine, carriers and face masks: the language of the coronavirus”

To put it another way: the language of explanations

Yuri_Arcurs/E+/GettyImages

by Liz Walter

In this post, I am going to talk about the language of explaining, something we all have to do from time to time. Continue reading “To put it another way: the language of explanations”

Let down and look after: the difference between phrasal verbs and prepositional verbs

JAG IMAGES/DigitalVision/GettyImages

by Liz Walter

My colleague Kate Woodford and I have written many posts about phrasal verbs because students find them difficult but know they need to learn them. These posts often include prepositional verbs, and readers sometimes ask about this. Continue reading “Let down and look after: the difference between phrasal verbs and prepositional verbs”

Clickbait and viral marketing: the language of advertising

Halfpoint Images/Moment/Getty Images

by Liz Walter

These days, most of us are targeted by adverts pretty much constantly, sometimes in obvious ways and sometimes more subtly. This post looks at the language around a phenomenon that many people would say is out of control. Continue reading “Clickbait and viral marketing: the language of advertising”