New words – 15 July 2019

Kenneth_Keifer / iStock / Getty Images Plus

agritecture noun [U]
UK /ˈæg.riˌtek.tʃəʳ/ US /ˈæg.rə.tek.tʃɚ/
the art and practice of designing and making buildings that are inspired by farm buildings, or this architectural style

Architects are not only converting period barns; they are being asked to design contemporary homes that echo grain silos and storage units clad in undulating tin. The rise of agritecture can be attributed to a rebellion against showy homes. While much of the architecture world wants to go bigger, shinier and more tricksy, some practices are heading in the other direction, where restraint and modesty lead to a home blending in with its location.
[The Times, 6 April 2018]

landscraper noun [C]
UK /ˈlændˌskreɪ.pəʳ/ US /ˈlændˌskreɪ.pɚ/
a very large building that takes up a lot of space on the land

KONE Corporation, a global leader in the elevator and escalator industry, has won an order to equip Google’s new UK headquarters building, KGX1. The 11-story-tall and 312-meter-long “landscraper” will run parallel to the platforms of London’s King’s Cross railway station in England and will sit at the heart of a campus for 7,000 Google employees.
[news.cision.com, 6 March 2019]

superblock noun [C]
UK /ˈsuː.pə.blɒk/ US /ˈsuː.pɚ.blɑːk/
a space in a city made up of several blocks, where only local traffic is permitted and the needs of the people who live there are given priority

On Barcelona’s superblocks, local access for motor vehicles is still permitted, but through traffic is not. The streets are designed to make drivers feel like they are visitors, with narrow rights-of-way for cars. Almost all car traffic is local residents or people with personal business on the block. Without dangerous car traffic overrunning the streets, generating noise and pollution, superblocks are full of life.
[vimeo.com, 3 August 2018]

About new words

New words – 8 July 2019

Westend61 / Getty

mean world syndrome noun [U]
UK /ˌmiːn.ˈwɜːld.sɪn.drəʊm/ US /ˌmiːn.ˈwɝːld.sɪn.droʊm/
a belief that the world is a more dangerous place than it actually is

Sarah Krongard and Mina Tsay-Vogel … published a paper examining whether people who view the most popular binge-watched shows see the world as meaner than it really is—a phenomenon known as “mean world syndrome.” This idea stems from a long-standing theory called cultivation, which proposes that watching television leads people to believe the real world is closely aligned to what they see on their screen.
[www.bu.edu, 6 March 2019]

super-feeler noun [C]
UK /ˈsuː.pə.ˌfiːləʳ/ US /ˈsuː.pɚ.ˌfiːlɚ/
someone who experiences their own emotions and those of other people very intensely

So what makes someone a super-feeler? According to Dr Z, super-feelers may be wired differently, with studies suggesting that they have an overactive amygdala, the “fire alarm” part of the brain that alerts us if a situation is perceived as threatening. But modern life can exacerbate things, particularly as it feels like we’ve never been busier, more tired or more stressed.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 28 July 2018]

interoception noun [U]
UK /ˌɪn.tər.əˈsep.ʃᵊn/ US /ˌɪn.t̬ɚˌr.əˈsep.ʃᵊn/
an awareness of the inside of the body

When we think of our senses, he explains, we imagine sight, sound, taste, touch and smell. Actually, these are just our exteroceptive senses, the ones that tell us about the outside world. Each of us also has interoception, the perception of sensations inside the body, like the pounding of my heart or the growling of your stomach.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 15 April 2019]

About new words

New words – 1 July 2019

Caiaimage / Paul Bradbury / Getty

flat white economy noun [U]
UK /ˌflæt.waɪt.iˈkɒn.ə.mi/ US /ˌflæt.waɪt.iˈkɑːn.ə.mi/
the wealth created through the large number of people using a coffee shop or café to work in, rather than working in an office

[This is] their adopted office where, thanks to a combination of flexible working and not being able to afford the heating bills in their own home, they are fuelling the “flat white economy”. This sector (so-called after the less-frothy coffee beloved of hipsters) is now the largest driver of Britain’s economic output, overtaking even the current manufacturing boom.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 1 April 2019]

blue economy noun [U]
UK /ˌbluː.iˈkɒn.ə.mi/ US /bluː.iˈkɑː.nə.mi/
the wealth created through the use of the world’s oceans, such as through jobs in the oil and fishing industries

Britain’s maritime heritage is quietly being reimagined as the “blue economy”, a sphere in which centuries-old sectors touch the forefront of technology to help create a more sustainable economic future.
[Sunday Telegraph, 15 April 2018]

anxiety economy noun [U]
UK /æŋˈzaɪ.ə.ti.iˈkɒn.ə.mi/ US /æŋˈzaɪ.ə.t̬i.iˈkɑː.nə.mi/
the wealth created through the production and sale of products designed to ease anxiety

The anxiety economy shows no signs of shrinking, with white noise machines, salt lamps and meditation headbands advertised alongside yoga selfies on Instagram. Aids for anxiety disorders in 2019 are branded like covetable scented candles – scrolling through the products, one starts to think of it as a small but universal ill like dry lips or shaving rash, and one just as easily treated.
[www.theguardian.com, 10 March 2019]

About new words

New words – 24 June 2019

Peter Cade / The Image Bank / Getty Images Plus

shoffice noun [C]
UK /ˈʃɒf.ɪs/ US /ˈʃɑːf.ɪs/
a garden shed that is used as an office

This spring, is your fancy turning towards a delightful garden room? Whether it’s a place to hang out (or hide from the family), an art studio, a gymnasium, a home office or shoffice, or even occasional accommodation for visitors, these stylish domestic add-ons have never been so popular.
[www.thetimes.co.uk, 22 February 2019]

shedio noun [C]
UK /ˈʃedi.əʊ/ US /ˈʃedi.oʊ/
a garden shed that is used as a studio for music or art

To facilitate Geoff’s picture choice, Lesley invited us to visit her “shedio”, a tiny creative space at the bottom of her garden in Peebles. With a husband and two teenage sons mad-keen on mountain biking, Lesley doesn’t even get the whole shed to play in as two thirds of the space is storage for bikes and outdoor gear!
[neveratalooseend.blogspot.com, 31 May 2018]

shed effect noun [U]
UK /ˈʃed.ɪˌfekt/ US /ˈʃed.əˌfekt/
the benefits to health and well-being that are associated with the men’s shed movement, an initiative that encourages men, and especially elderly or socially isolated men, to work together on traditionally male-focused activities, such as DIY projects and repairing things, and make new friendships

Experts at Glasgow Caledonian University are to explore the “shed effect”, to determine whether men who join a “shed” – the name given to such community groups – experience a boost to their well-being.
[The Herald, 25 June 2018]

About new words

New words – 17 June 2019

Westend61 / Getty

superager noun [C]
UK /suː.pər.ˈeɪ.dʒəʳ/ US /suː.pɚ.ˈeɪ.dʒɚ/
someone over the age of 65 whose memory and thinking skills are similar to those of someone in their 20s

Her advice is based on a study of “superagers”, individuals 65 years or older, whose cognitive skills are as acute as the average 25-year-old. Barrett believes that what sets superagers apart is their ability to use the unpleasant feelings they experience when challenging themselves as a signal to keep going, rather than as a warning to stop and rest.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 10 July 2018]

silver striver noun [C]
UK /sɪl.və.ˈstraɪvəʳ/ US /sɪl.vɚ.ˈstraɪvɚ/
someone who continues to work after they have passed the typical retirement age

Peter Stanway, 72, is helping to design a block of flats overlooking the zebra crossing that appears on the cover of the Beatles’ Abbey Road. Although he started drawing his state pension at 70, he still works between 30 and 50 hours a week and has no plans to retire until he is 80. Stanway … is part of a new demographic — the silver strivers. These are the baby boomers who, when they reached state pension age, simply kept on working.
[Sunday Times, 11 March 2018]

grey tsunami noun [S]
/greɪ.tsuːˈnɑː.mi/
the high number of elderly people in the world in the 21st century, caused by people living longer and by the “baby boomer” generation now reaching old age

We have been warned, for years, of a so-called “grey tsunami” that is about to crash into our society. … This represents a challenge for hospitals, nursing homes and families. And it comes with significant costs. Describing this demographic shift as a “grey tsunami” — with its terrifying image of a monstrous wave poised to break over our heads — is striking and urgent.
[www.cba.ca, 15 October 2017]

About new words

New words – 10 June 2019

Paul Bradbury / Caiaimage / Getty

cleanstagrammer noun [C]
UK /ˈkliːn.stə.græm.əʳ/ US /ˈkliːn.stə.græm.ɚ/
someone who posts advice and tips about housework and cleaning on the Instagram social media site

Twelve years on, Bray, 37, is better known as “The Organised Mum” to her 142,000 Instagram followers, and part of the cleanstagrammer boom sweeping across social media. Where Instagram was once full of clean-eating gurus showcasing their latest green smoothie, it’s now full of cleaning influencers … showcasing the genius cleaning hacks behind their sparkling homes.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 1 March 2019]

sponcon noun [U]
UK /ˈspɒn.kɒn/ US /ˈspɑːn.kɑːn/
abbreviation for sponsored content: posts on social media sites such as Instagram where the poster is being paid by a company to promote its product

When done correctly, sponcon is mutually beneficial to the reader, the brand, and the influencer. With the added transparency of how much influencers can make (take a look at Zoe Sugg’s net worth, if you want to make yourself feel really bad!) it’s no wonder teenagers and young adults are intrigued by what they can do with their own social platforms.
[www.found.co.uk, 15 February 2019]

outfluencer noun [C]
UK /ˈaʊt.ˌflu.ən.səʳ/ US /ˈaʊt.ˌflu.ən.sɚ/
an influencer (someone who uses their social media posts to change the way that other people behave or the things they buy) who posts about outdoor adventure, extreme sport, etc.

Reached peak influencer? Start following some outfluencers – what we’re calling the digital answer to Bear Grylls. You’ll find them catching waves, scaling precarious rockfaces and hurtling themselves from any fixed structure. Live (vicariously) on the edge.
[Women’s Health (UK), January/February 2019]

About new words

New words – 3 June 2019

Hill Street Studios /
DigitalVision / Getty Images Plus

EGOT noun [C or U]
UK /ˈiː .gɒt/ US /ˈiː.gɑːt/
the achievement of winning an Emmy (TV), a Grammy (music), an Oscar (film), and a Tony (theatre), the four major entertainment awards

Composer Richard Rogers was the first to achieve EGOT status in 1962 with his Emmy for the original music he composed for television’s “Winston Churchill: The Valiant Years,” starting a tradition of composers being among the most frequent kinds of entertainment professionals to win all four awards. Actors and producers have also historically been better positioned to complete an EGOT collection.
[www.cnbc.com, 21 February 2019]

sadcom noun [C]
UK /ˈsæd.kɒm/ US /ˈsæd.kɑːm/
a type of sitcom (a funny television or radio show in which the same characters appear in each episode) that uses humour to deal with serious themes

It’s perhaps surprising, then, that series four has seen the show delve ever further into sadcom territory – popularised by the likes of Master of None, Bojack Horseman and Fleabag – as it increasingly examines the difficulties its protagonists face rather than playing up their ineptitude for lols.
[www.theguardian.com, 19 September 2017]

slow TV noun [U]
UK /ˌsləʊ.tiːˈviː/ US /ˌsloʊ.tiːˈviː/
a genre of TV programmes that usually last for several hours and show an ordinary event, such as a train journey, taking place in real time, designed to be relaxing for the viewer

Slow TV is a wildly successful phenomenon in its home country of Norway and it’s something we can totally see exploding in popularity here in the States. Essentially, Norwegian television crews strap cameras to various forms of transportation or insert them into activities and record hours-long programs. There’s no plot, cast, or season premieres and finales. Yet millions of people tune in to watch.
[coolmaterial.com, no date]

About new words

New words – 27 May 2019

Andriy Onufriyenko / Moment / Getty

algocracy noun [U]
UK /ˌæl.ˈgɒk.rə.si/ US /ˌæl.ˈgɑː.krə.si/
a social system where people are governed and important decisions are made by computer algorithms

Robots could use vast amounts of data and an insidious knowledge of ways to manipulate human behaviour to effectively take over vast swathes of our lives in what would effectively become rule by algorithm, or an ‘algocracy’, the head of the City watchdog has warned.
[www.telegraph.co.uk, 11 July 2018]

cyberdefender noun [C]
UK /ˈsaɪ.bə.dɪfen.dəʳ/ US /ˈsaɪ.bɚ.dɪfen.dɚ/
a person who takes actions to protect a workplace from cybercrime (=crime or illegal activity that is done using the internet)

To build the best line of defense for your business, you need to take a communal approach to your cybersecurity strategy. Cybercrime is modern crime; there is no silver bullet. That’s why everybody within your company needs to be a cyberdefender.
[www.business.com, 1 November 2018]

Silicon Gorge noun [U]
UK /ˌsɪl.ɪ.kən.ˈgɔːdʒ/ US /ˌsɪl.ɪ.kən.ˈgɔːrdʒ/
a region in the southwest of England, specifically the area around the city of Bristol, where numerous tech companies are located

California may be able to boast of Silicon Valley, but in a (not so) quiet corner of southwest England lies … Silicon Gorge. Home to a growing number of exciting Bristol startups, this zone of commercial enterprise is fast becoming an aspirational hotspot for tech wizards and ambitious business leaders alike.
[www.ignite.digital, 15 September 2017]

About new words

New words – 20 May 2019

Tom Eversley / EyeEm / Getty

blood avocado noun [C]
UK /ˌblʌd.æv.əˈkɑː.dəʊ/ US /ˌblʌd.æv.əˈkɑː.doʊ/
an avocado that has been grown in an area controlled by a drug cartel (=a criminal group that produces illegal drugs) and that forces farmers to give that group a percentage of their income from growing the fruit

Avocado on toast might be off the menu. British and Irish restaurants are increasingly ditching them over concerns that Latin American imports are damaging the environment and funding Mexican drug cartels. Growers in Michoacán, west Mexico, have had their land seized by drug lords who are reported to be earning £150m a year by selling the so-called ‘blood avocados’ to British traders.
[The Guardian, 10 December 2018]

coffee name noun [C]
UK /ˈkɒf.i.neɪm/ US /ˈkɑː.fi.neɪm/
a name you give when ordering a coffee or in similar situations because it is easier to pronounce or spell than your real name

Ordering a morning coffee in a busy café can be difficult for anyone, but it becomes especially difficult when you have a name baristas seem unable to understand. Many people opt for a ‘coffee name’, usually a short Anglo-Saxon name like Jack or Jess, or an Anglo-Saxon name that sounds similar to their real non-Anglo-Saxon name. The idea of a coffee name is not unique to Australia, with social media posts of mangled names being shared by coffee lovers in the United States and United Kingdom.
[www.sbs.com.au, 12 January 2016]

chrono-nutrition noun [U]
UK /ˌkrɒn.ə.njuːˈtrɪʃ.ᵊn/ US /ˌkrɒn.ə.nuːˈtrɪʃ.ᵊn/
a way of eating based on the theory that when we eat, as well as what we eat, has an important influence on our health

Chrono-nutrition is an evolving and developing field of science which is beginning to show how our ancient biology is in conflict with our modern lifestyle. The mechanisms behind why time of eating may influence health are not entirely clear.
[Medical Research Council, mrc.ukri.org, 19 June 2018]

About new words

New words – 13 May 2019

courtneyk / E+ / Getty Images

generation scroll noun [U]
UK /ˌdʒen.əˈreɪ.ʃən.ˈskrəʊl/ US /ˌdʒen.əˈreɪ.ʃən.ˈskroʊl/
a way of referring to the generation of people who watch TV, read news, etc. mostly on a computer or mobile phone

This 25th annual analysis of media habits, based on a survey of 2,000 young people, says this is now ‘generation scroll’ – in which most viewing is through mobile internet devices, whether a phone, laptop or tablet computer. Only 10% now get ‘almost all’ their TV programmes through a TV screen.
[www.bbc.co.uk/news, 30 January 2019]

textavism noun [U]
/ˈtekst.ə.vɪ.zᵊm/
the use of text messages to try to persuade people to act in a way that will achieve a particular result, usually a political or social one

In the past year, text activism, or textavism, has consumed nearly all of Butler’s limited spare time … It often involves sending text messages to voters in swing states. ‘We try to apply pressure where we can do the most good’, Butler said. Recently, in the course of twenty-four hours, texters from MoveOn, where Butler volunteers, sent more than two million messages urging registered Democrats to vote in November.
[www.newyorker.com, 5 November 2018]

sadfishing noun [U]
/ˈsæd.fɪʃ.ɪŋ/
the practice of writing about one’s unhappiness or emotional problems on social media, especially in a vague way, in order to attract attention and sympathetic responses

You’ll have seen sadfishing happening on Facebook. Any time someone puts ‘I’m just so done with all this’ as their Facebook status without any explanation and then replies to anyone who asks a follow question with ‘I’ll PM you’: that’s sadfishing. If you’re a supermodel and influencer from the Hollywood Hills then sadfishing will make you money in #sponcon.
[www.metro.co.uk, 21 January 2019]

About new words