New words – 20 February 2017

Anastasiia_M/iStock/Getty Images Plus
Anastasiia_M/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Calexit noun [U] /kæl.’ek.sɪt/
an exit by the state of California from the United States of America

Californians would need to pass an amendment to the US Constitution, which requires the blessings of the other 49 states. The measure would also survey voters on whether a “Calexit” is something that interests them.
[Business Insider 21.11.2016]

Bremoaner noun [C] UK /brə.’məʊn.ə/ US /brə.’moʊn.ɚ/
someone who complains about Britain’s exit from the European Union

Anybody asking questions about our future relationship with our biggest trading partner is dismissed as a Bremoaner. I have been called worse in my time. 
[www.dailymail.co.uk 30.10.2016]

democracy sausage noun [C] UK /dɪˈmɒk.rə.si ˈsɒs.ɪdʒ/ US /dɪˈmɑː.krə.si ˈsɑː.sɪdʒ/
a sausage cooked on a barbecue and served on bread, sold at polling booths on election day in Australia

A humble barbequed sausage on a slice of bread sold at polling booths around Australia has been picked as the country’s official word of the year — “democracy sausage.”
[www.apnews.com 14.12.2016]

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New words – 13 February 2017

Jonathan Fletcher/EyeEm/Getty
Jonathan Fletcher/EyeEm/Getty

thrisis noun [C] /ˈθraɪ.sɪs/
feelings of unhappiness, worry, and disappointment that some people experience when they are around 30 years old and that can sometimes lead them to make important changes in their life

From the outside, my life looks pretty good. I’m 32. I have fantastic friends and a great job … So why do I feel like I’m doing everything wrong? Welcome to the 30-something crisis – or ‘thrisis’ – the feeling that, just a decade into being a grown-up, you’re running out of time.
[Grazia, 22 November 2016]

JAM noun [C] /dʒæm/
abbreviation for just about managing; used in the UK to describe people who have just enough money to survive, but nothing more

Jams account for two-thirds of all families with children receiving tax credits … More than two thirds have less than a month’s income’s worth of savings. So, the argument goes, Jams are especially vulnerable to weak income growth, rising costs and the freeze on working-age benefits until 2019.
[www.bbc.co.uk/news 21 November 2016]

social menopause noun [U] UK ˈsəʊ.ʃəl ˈmen.ə.pɔːz US ˈsoʊ.ʃəl ˈmen.ə.pɑːz
the time in a woman’s life when she no longer wants to stay out late, go to parties etc.

Late-twenties social menopause opens up space for new ventures. Maybe we’ll finally learn to cook. Maybe we’ll actually start saving.
 [www.manrepeller.com 05 October 2016]

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New words – 6 February 2017

KidStock/Blend Images/Getty
KidStock/Blend Images/Getty

Gameboy disease noun [U]
/ˈgeɪm.bɔɪ dɪz.iːz/
a spinal condition in children caused by looking down at hand-held devices for long periods

Kids these days are spending so much time hunched over smartphones and tablets that their spines are at risk of developing incorrectly – a condition known as gameboy disease.
[www.mirror.co.uk 07 June 2016]

computer vision syndrome noun [U]
UK /kəm’pjuː.tᵊ ˌvɪʒ.ən ˌsɪn.drəʊm/ US /kəmˈpjuː.t̬ɚˌvɪʒ.ən ˌsɪn.droʊm/
a condition of the eye caused by spending a large amount of time looking at a computer screen

We spend nearly 50 hours a week looking at computer screens, according to research conducted by the College of Optometrists. But prolonged use can result in what has been dubbed “computer vision syndrome”, with symptoms including eye strain, double vision and temporary short-sightedness.
[www.express.co.uk 27 January 2016]

thunderstorm asthma noun [U] UK
/ˈθʌn.də.stɔːm æs.mə/ US /ˈθʌn.dɚ.stɔːrm æz.mə/
a medical condition that makes breathing difficult, caused by a large amount of pollen in the air after a storm

A sixth person has died almost a week after Melbourne was hit by an unprecedented thunderstorm asthma outbreak. 
[The Guardian 27 November 2016]

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New words – 30 January 2017

South_agency/iStock/Getty Images Plus
South_agency/iStock/Getty Images Plus

tech bro noun [C] UK /’tek.brəʊ/ US /’tek.broʊ/
a rich young man who works in the technology industry

The unfortunate tech bro insurgency in San Francisco continues with a guy … who has lived in the Bay Area for all of three years … and recently felt entitled enough to write the mayor and police chief about his distaste for the homeless. 
[www.jezebel.com 18 February 2016]

Textalyzer noun [C] UK /ˈtekst.ᵊl.aɪz.əʳ/ US /ˈtekst.ᵊl.aɪz.ɚ/
a device that the police could use to check if a driver has been using their phone while driving

The most provocative idea, from lawmakers in New York, is to give police officers a new device that is the digital equivalent of the Breathalyzer — a roadside test called the Textalyzer. 
[New York Times, 27 April 2016]

digital twin noun [C] UK /ˌdɪdʒ.ɪ.tᵊl ‘twɪn/ US /ˌdɪdʒ.ə.t̬ᵊl ‘twɪn/
a digital representation of a product or piece of equipment

Dunsdon says these “digital twins” are using information gathered during manufacture and operation to make predictions about the future. 
[www.ukbusinessinsider.com 11.07.2016]

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New words – 23 January 2017

PASIEKA/Science Photo Library/Getty
PASIEKA/Science Photo Library/Getty

deep learning noun [U]
UK /ˈdiːp ˌlɜː.nɪŋ/ US /ˈdiːp ˌlɝː.nɪŋ/
a branch of artificial intelligence that uses algorithms based on the neural networks of the brain

They’ve all been made possible by a family of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques popularly known as deep learning, though most scientists still prefer to call them by their original academic designation: deep neural networks.
[www.fortune.com 28 September 2016]

cybersoldier noun [C] UK  /ˈsaɪ.bəˌsəʊl.dʒəʳ/ US /ˈsaɪ.bɚˌsoʊl.dʒɚ/
a member of the military who works in the field of cyberwarfare

Through this new kind of training, the Army is trying to perfect the fieldcraft of these experts in computers and digital warfare – cybersoldiers.
[www.usnews.com 29 August 2016]

malicious insider noun [C] UK /məˌlɪʃ.əs ɪnˈsaɪ.dəʳ/ US /məˌlɪʃ.əs ɪnˈsaɪ.dɚ/
a person within an organization whose actions threaten the security of that organization’s activities or data

One in fifty employees is believed to be a malicious insider.
[SC Magazine 15 September 2016]

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New words – 16 January 2017

ALLVISIONN/iStock/Getty Images Plus
ALLVISIONN/iStock/Getty Images Plus

escape room noun [C] UK /ɪˈskeɪp ˌruːm/ US /ɪˈskeɪp ˌrʊm/
an activity that involves locking people in a room and giving them a set amount of time to escape by solving a series of puzzles

Escape rooms are very much the trendy way to gather your friends and family for a night out. You can put their puzzle skills to the test as the clock counts down every last second of your frantic attempts to emerge victorious from a locked room.
[Daily Record 22 October 2016]

night czar noun [C] UK /ˈnaɪt.ˌzɑʳ/ US /ˈnaɪt.ˌzɑːr/
a person who has been given special powers by the government to deal with a city’s night-time activities and events

Newly appointed London night czar Amy Lamé has described the challenge of reducing the number of live venue and nightclub closures as her “total priority” in a conversation with Music Week. 
[www.musicweek.com 7 November 2016]

micro-adventure noun [C] UK /ˈmaɪ.krəʊ.ədˌven.tʃəʳ/ US /ˈmaɪ.kroʊ.ədˌven.tʃɚ/
a short, exciting activity, such as a trip or experience

Bored of the 9 to 5? A micro-adventure could be just the thing.
[www.adaptnetwork.com 22 November 2016]

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New words – 9 January 2016

LittleBee80/iStock/Getty
LittleBee80/iStock/Getty

breadcrumber noun [C] UK /ˈbred.krʌməʳ/ US /ˈbred.krʌmɚ/
someone who contacts another person very infrequently

For anyone who’s ever dated, or maintained any kind of relationship in the digital age, you have probably known a breadcrumber. They communicate via sporadic non-committal, but repeated messages – or breadcrumbs – that are just enough to keep you wondering but not enough to seal the deal (whatever that deal may be.)
[New York Times 10 July 2016]

inconvenience fee noun [C] UK /ˌɪn.kənˈviː.ni.əns.fiː/ US /ˌɪn.kənˈviː.n.jəns.fiː/
an amount of money paid to make up for causing someone problems or trouble

Mariah Carey is demanding a $50 million dollar inconvenience fee from her ex-fiancé James Packer. Now that the couple has broken up, Mariah feels as though she wasted her time with the Australian businessman and wants to be compensated for the time she lost.
[www.celebdirtylaundry.com 31 October 2016]

sleep divorce noun [U] UK /ˈsliːp.dɪ.vɔːs/ US /ˈsliːp.dɪ.vɔːrs/
an arrangement where a couple chooses to sleep in separate beds or bedrooms

Relationship counsellor Dr Nandini Roy says, “I’ve seen many women and men say that though they love their partners a lot, sometimes they … would love to sleep separately. To keep your relationship going, you should consider sleep divorce whenever you feel the need to sleep alone.”
[The Times of India 23 March 2016]

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New words – 2 January 2017

baona/E+/Getty
baona/E+/Getty

adulting noun [U] UK ‘æd.ʌlt.ɪŋ US ə’d.ʌlt.ɪŋ
doing things that are associated with being an adult

A few nights ago, I got home from work and sat on my bed, scrolling through Twitter. I didn’t get far in my timeline before I saw a tweet from a twentysomething who said she was “adulting” because she cooked herself dinner. Ugh.
[Cosmopolitan 20 June 2016]

bird’s nest parenting noun [U] UK ˌbɜ:dz.nest.ˈpeə.rən.tɪŋ US ˌbɝ:dz.nest.ˈper.ən.t̬ɪŋ
an arrangement where the children of a couple who have separated remain in the family home and their parents take it in turns to live with them there

Instead of moving the children each weekend or each month, ‘bird’s nest parenting’ sees the mother and father do the rotating in and out of the home – while the children remain the constants.
[www.dailymail.co.uk 17 October 2016]

sharenting noun [U] UK ‘ʃeə.rənt.ɪŋ US ‘ʃe.rənt.ɪŋ
using social media excessively to share information about one’s children

In the United States, according to a survey, 90 per cent of two-year-olds have a presence on social media … The UK is going the same way. There is a commensurate rise in concern that sharenting — obsessive peacocking about your offspring’s looks, sporting achievements and toilet-training schedule — could be damaging. 
[The Times 05 November2016]

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New words – 26 December 2016

coreylynntucker/RooM/Getty
coreylynntucker/RooM/Getty

Broga™ noun [U] UK ˈbrəʊ.gə US ˈbroʊ.gə
a type of yoga designed to appeal to men

Men who crave the benefits of yoga, but recoil at sharing the experience with a room full of women are turning to Broga, a rugged take on the 3,000-year-old practice of movement and breath.
[www.reuters.com 27.04.2015]

AFOL noun [C] UK eɪ.ˌef.əʊ.’el US eɪ.ˌef.oʊ.’el
abbreviation for adult fan of Lego™: an adult who enjoys building models from Lego™

Chrys B. of Heathcote, Australia had an interest in LEGO in her early teens but endured a Dark Age that lasted a number of decades until she discovered the Star Wars LEGO range. It was after attending Brickvention 2012 that she decided she really was an AFOL.
[www.thebrickroomblog.com August 2016]

droneboarding noun [U] UK ‘drəʊn.bɔːd.ɪŋ US droʊn.bɔːrd.ɪŋ
the activity or sport of moving over snow standing on a snowboard and being pulled by a drone

Droneboarding is the newly developed practice of using a drone to drag around someone on a snowboard. [A] video filmed in late January shows a standard-sized human being dragged around on a snowboard by a very large drone.
[www.yahoo.com 03.02.2016]

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New words – 19 December 2016

cyano66/iStock/Getty Images Plus
cyano66/iStock/Getty Images Plus

the internet of me noun [S]
UK ˌɪn.tə.net əv ‘miː US ˌɪn.t̬ɚ.net əv ‘miː
a system of objects with computing devices in them that are able to connect to each other using the internet and exchange personal data about their owner

eBay’s founder has invested in a startup that claims to use data aggregation to create the “internet of me” … The startup’s app collects data from its users’ social networks, including pictures and posts.
[www.wired.com 27 September 2016]

device mesh noun [S] dɪˈvaɪs meʃ
a network of electronic devices that can find information and communicate with other people and organizations using the internet

We’re still using mobile devices, but we’ve now added tablets and smart watches to the ever-multiplying list of end-points we use to access applications and information. [Analyst company] Gartner refers to this trend as ‘the device mesh’…
[www.itproportal.com 30 April 2016]

trust score noun [C] UK ‘trʌst ˌskɔː US ‘trʌst ˌskɔːr
a way of communicating with a computer to prove who you are without the need for a password

Google wants to get rid of your password. The company has proposed a system it calls “trust scores” to remove the need to remember usual numerical and linguistic credentials using a ‘Trust API’ … The API would factor in a number of personal identifiers including the way your voice sounds, facial recognition, location in relation to known Wi-Fi networks and Bluetooth devices and typing speed. 
[www.wired.com 25 May 2016]

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