New words – 12 October 2015

climatejustice

climate justice noun the holding to account of those responsible for climate change and reparation for those most affected by it

I just finished reading the pope’s message to the world on climate justice.I feel energized and have joined a group of people at my church, St. Joseph University Parish, who feel the same.

[www.buffalonews.com 29 June 2015]

When the General Synod is held in July its members will be asked to vote on holding a day of prayer and fasting for ‘climate justice’.

[www.independent.co.uk 19 June 2015]

carbon bomb noun a set of conditions that will likely give rise to a catastrophic increase in carbon emissions in the future

The ‘carbon bomb’ stored in the thawing Arctic permafrost may be released in a slow leak as global warming takes hold, rather than an eruption, according to new research.

[www.theguardian.com 09 April 2015]

fracklog noun oil or gas that will be fracked when oil and gas prices are higher but that for now, remain in the ground

The number of wells waiting to be hydraulically fractured, known as the fracklog, has tripled in the past year as companies delay work in order to avoid pumping more oil while prices are low.

[www.bloomberg.com 23 April 2015]

About new words

5 thoughts on “New words – 12 October 2015

  1. Pingback: (EN) – New words: 12 October 2015 | Cambridge University Press | Glossarissimo!

  2. Forgive me if I’m in the wrong place, but I don’t know where else to post a comment. Anyway, my comment is on the British pronunciation of the word “world” that you show elsewhere in this website. While I am sure that many British people pronounce the word as you show, I have to wonder about “WALD”. Yes, “WALD”. That is a pronunciation that I frequently hear. Is it something new? Could it be the personal idiosyncrasy of a particular female news commentator? All I know is that when I listen to British newscasts, which is not often, I frequently hear a woman butchering the word in this way. What’s the story? Is she perhaps kept on for comedy relief?

  3. fipplepop

    Forgive me if I’m in the wrong place, but I don’t know where else to post a comment. Anyway, my comment is on the British pronunciation of the word “world” that you show elsewhere in this website. While I am sure that many British people pronounce the word as you show, I have to wonder about “WALD”. Yes, “WALD”. That is a pronunciation that I frequently hear. Is it something new? Could it be the personal idiosyncrasy of a particular female news commentator? All I know is that when I listen to British newscasts, which is not often, I frequently hear a woman butchering the word in this way. What’s the story? Is she perhaps kept on for comedy relief?

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