Archive for the ‘New words’ Category

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New words – 21 April 2014

April 21, 2014

eyebomb

eyebomb verb to stick small, googly eyes on inanimate objects, thereby turning them into an amusing approximation of a face

Try This Halloween Decorating Idea: Eyebomb with Googly Eyes

[www.apartmenttherapy.com 11 October 2013]

 

gelfie noun informal a selfie photograph taken at the gym

While us mere mortals wouldn’t dream of sharing a picture of ourself looking red-faced and sweaty pumping iron, it seems the gelfie is a popular picture choice among stars keen to flaunt their athletic abilities.

[www.dailymail.co.uk 07 November 2013]

yogi noun a photograph of themselves taken by someone doing yoga, often for the purposes of posting on a social networking website

[...] the Oxford English Dictionary people announced that ‘selfie’ was to be the official word of the year. Little did they know that all the coolest, on-trend people had already moved on to ‘yogis’ (yoga + selfie) and ‘belfies’ (bum + selfie).

[The Guardian (UK broadsheet) 07 December 2013]

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New words – 14 April 2014

April 14, 2014

deadcathole

dead-cat hole noun informal the space between the top of a car tyre and the body of the car

US models will have larger dead-cat holes than European ones. Cat lovers can gripe to the EPA,

[Car & Driver (US automotive magazine) Oct. 2013]

banking desert noun a neighbourhood or other area where there are no banks

From our member station WYSO, Lewis Wallace reports on a recent branch closure in Dayton, Ohio, that creates a banking desert nearly five miles wide.

[NPR: Morning Edition (US news and public affairs) 13 November 2013]

concierge medicine noun a sector of medical practice where extra attention is given to wealthy patients able to pay a high price

Members of the affluent classes routinely question the merits of doctors who do take insurance. [...] This psychology, along with cost-cutting strategies pursued by insurance companies [...] have driven the field of concierge medicine.

[New York Times (US broadsheet) 08 December 2013]

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New words – 7 April 2014

April 7, 2014

unplugged_wedding

unplugged wedding noun a wedding at which no one is allowed to bring phones so that there will be no photos posted to facebook or instagramming

Unplugged weddings are becoming very popular here in the UK and have great advantages for all involved in the wedding. An unplugged wedding simply means that you’ve politely asked your guests not to use phones, cameras or other devices during your wedding or at least during the wedding service or ceremony.

[www.blog.kathrynandrewsphotography.com 03 October 2013]

dark sky park noun a nature reserve that is protected from light pollution by night

International dark sky parks are areas where the night sky is protected and lighting controls are in place to prevent light pollution.

[www.bbc.co.uk 06 December 2013]

quietway noun a backstreet, cycle-dedicated road which cars are not allowed on

Mayor Boris Johnson’s Vision for Cycling document also proposes the introduction of so-called Quietways on ‘low-traffic back streets’ for cyclists to use

[www.bbc.co.uk 14 November 2013]

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New words – 31 March 2014

March 31, 2014

digital_dementia

digital dementia noun impairment of brain function as a result of overuse of screens, leading, for example, to inability to recall phone numbers/dates of birth/PINs, etc.

So that means that many of us, including kids who grew up with technology and those of us who adopted it in our later lives as part of living in the modern world, may not be destined to digital dementia indefinitely after.

[www.alzheimers.net 12 November 2013]

digital water cooler idiom informal a social network on which people talk about something such as a TV show or sports event

In recent months [Facebook and Twitter] have engaged in an escalating battle [...] to claim the title of the nation’s digital water cooler as they woo networks and advertisers.

[New York Times (US broadsheet) 02 October 2013]

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New words – 24 March 2014

March 24, 2014

brodog1

brodog noun slang a young man who watches sports and hangs out in bars with other similarly-minded young men

SNOW! Snow? Snow. … Or if you’re a brodog, you might be currently scheming on some confrontation [snowball fight] at Dupont Circle, since that’s now tradition.

[Lunchline with Clinton Yates view.ed4.net/v/2GZNC0/FKSB2M/30D3EOW/ROJOOD/ (Washington Post blog) 10 December 2013]

dead-cat hole noun informal the space between the top of a car tire and the body of the car

US models will have larger dead-cat holes then European ones. Cat lovers can gripe to the EPA.

[Car & Driver (US automotive magazine) Oct. 2013]

dog shaming noun the practice of taking a picture of your dog with a sign (usually around its neck) explaining its misdemeanour and then posting it on the Internet

Internet ‘dog-shaming’ craze undermines pets’ dignity, say vets who claim unfortunate canines look terrified in online photos.

[www.dailymail.co.uk 08 November 2013]

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New words – 17 March 2014

March 17, 2014

robot_doctor2

anti-vaxxer noun a derogatory word for a person who refuses to have their child vaccinated for a particular disease

Why would the FDA appoint a known anti-vaxxer to their committee?

[http://doubtfulnews.com 17 November 2013]

digital autopsy noun a non-invasive autopsy which involves 3-D scanning, rather than the cutting open of the corpse

The UK’s first dedicated digital autopsy centre opens in Sheffield on Wednesday, heralding a potential revolution in the way postmortems are conducted.

[www.theguardian.com 27 November 2013]

electroceutical noun electrical stimulation used to provide pain relief

They see a chest of medical devices: ‘smart stents’ that report on how well an artery is healing; a pump that titrates medicine into hard-to-reach tissue; ‘electoceuticals’ that fight pain with electrical pulses rather than drugs.

[Smithsonian (US culture and science magazine) Dec. 2013]

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New words – 10 March 2014

March 10, 2014

soldier_dogEDC abbreviation explosive detection canine: a dog trained to sniff out explosives

This is where MSA security trains what are known in the security trade as explosive detection canines, or EDCs.

[Smithsonian (US science and society magazine) Aug. 2013]

GPU abbreviation graphics processing unit; a processor used primarily for 3D functions

Here they let you know whether your smartphone use requires a quad-core processor, whether to value CPU over GPU and how to get the perfect balance between a thin handset and a long lasting battery.

[http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ 09 August 2013]

HDR abbreviation High Dynamic Range: a software system for photography that generates a single image incorporating the best light and focus from several consecutive photos of the same scene

But there have been barriers to using HDR. The primary issue is that moving subjects change position from shot to shot in a series.

[New York Times (US broadsheet) 08 August 2013]

ICYMI abbreviation in case you missed it (internet/text etc., abbreviation)

ICYMI: Here’s an amazing video of a man named Jason Mortensen coming to after having surgery and realizing that he’s married to a beautiful woman.

[www.papermag.com 11 September 2013]

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New words – 3 March 2014

March 3, 2014

LAT abbreviation living apart together: the situation of two people in a relationship living in different homes

The LAT lifestyle is healthy, according to all the studies. OK, one study.

[New York Times (US broadsheet) 21 July 2013]

LDR abbreviation long distance relationship

I am 20 and I’ve been in LDR’s for about the past 2 years (2 guys). My current boyfriend is wonderful and we get along great.

[www.city-data.com 02 August 2013]

NGL abbreviation not gonna lie (internet abbreviation)

NGL, I’ve been on “vacation” for 4 months but really it’s only been August that has felt like a well spent month of vacation.

[posted on US blogger's website 3 September 2013]

TL;DR abbreviation too long, didn’t read; abbreviation used in texts, posts, etc.

I just wrote 1500 words for a post on Living in Ireland. God even I was bored at the end of it! The TL/DR version: MBH and myself are having a lovely fight about whether we talk about moving from Ireland or not.

[http://notebookscribbles.com/ 18 August 2013]

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New words – 24 February 2014

February 24, 2014

smartwatch noun a watch that can be used as a computer or phone, with a small keyboard

And Lee Young Hee, the company’s executive vice president, confirmed earlier this year that Samsung would be developing a smartwatch.

[www.telegraph.co.uk 09 August 2013]

Gameboy back noun a spinal problem in children caused by overuse of gaming consoles

Rise of the ‘Gameboy Back’: Children are developing curvature of the spine because they hunch over consoles and smartphones

[www.dailymail.co.uk (title) 12 August 2012]

midcore adjective describes video games that are midway on the cline between hardcore and casual

While iOS games started out as either simple physics or casual simulation titles when the platform launched about five years ago, the bar has gotten steadily higher and more hard-core. Midcore studios like Kabam started to rise in prominence.

[http://techcrunch.com 25 July 2013]

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New words – 17 February 2014

February 17, 2014

footsie noun informal a photograph of one’s own foot

Love the footsie!

[Heard in conversation (girl, teens) 13 August 2013]

legsie noun informal a photograph of one’s own legs

But holiday social media photos brings another phenomenon – the legsie. Photos, typically taken by the pool or beach, of the bottom half of our legs (as an example see my legs poolside in Miami in the photo above).

[www.matt-rhodes.co.uk 03 August 2013]

Oversharers beware, not everyone wants constant updates on your summer break. Try to hold back from the selfies, the legsies and all those smug hashtags.

[www.theguardian.com 31 July 2013]

~ adjective slang online symbol used before a noun to show that you do not think that something is really what it purports to be

Recently, I’ve noticed increased usage of the tilde, used online to signify disdain at a word or concept: ‘Perez Hilton’s ~journalism’, ‘David Cameron’s ~caring policies’, and so on.

[The Guardian (UK broadsheet) 16 September 2013]

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