Flaring up and bouncing back: phrasal verbs relating to illness

by Kate Woodford A recent blog that we published on phrasal verbs meaning ‘argue’ was very popular, reminding us to keep providing you with useful sets of these important items! This week, then, we’re looking at phrasal verbs and prepositional verbs connected with illness and recovery.

Getting the hang of it (Words and phrases for getting used to things)

by Kate Woodford Getting used to things is a part of life. We all deal with situations, tasks or tools that are new to us. At first, they may seem difficult or strange. With time or practice, they become familiar and normal.  In this blog, we look at the language for expressing this idea. Starting with …

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Egging on, storming out and making up: phrasal verbs connected with arguing (2).

by Liz Walter My last post looked at phrasal and prepositional verbs connected with starting arguments and what happens during arguments. Today I’ll start with describing other people’s involvement in an argument and then go on to talking about what happens when an argument is over.

Out of the blue (Words and phrases for unexpected events)

by Kate Woodford Many of the things that happen to us are expected or even planned but some are not. Some of these unexpected events are welcome while others are less so. In this post, we take a look at the words and phrases that we use to relate events that happen when we are least …

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He really winds me up! The language of annoying others

by Kate Woodford We try hard not to, but from time to time we all annoy each other. It’s just inevitable. Sometimes we annoy each other with things that we say and sometimes with our actions. So how do we talk about this when it happens? Well, there are a lot of phrases to express annoyance, …

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Phrasal verbs for reading

by Kate Woodford Sometimes we read to find out information and at other times, we read simply for pleasure. We may read the whole of a text or only parts of it. To describe the different ways in which we read, we often use phrasal verbs. This week, then, we take a look at those ‘reading’ …

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How much did that set you back? (Money phrasal verbs)

by Kate Woodford This week we’re looking at the wealth of phrasal verbs in English that relate to money, including those used for having and not having money, those for saving money and those for spending it. Starting with a very common phrasal verb, if you pay off a sum that you owe to a bank …

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I’m just easing myself back into work (Phrasal verbs for describing how hard we are working or studying)

by Kate Woodford One morning in early January, I met a friend in a café and told her that I was easing myself back into work after the holidays. By using this phrase ‘to ease myself (back) into work’, I meant that I was slowly starting to work again after a period without work (I planned …

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It’s good to get away. (Phrasal verbs/Multi-word verbs relating to travel)

by Kate Woodford​ For many of us, the summer season is now ending. How did you spend it? Did you manage to get away (= go somewhere different) for a week or two? Perhaps you were too busy working or studying to take time off (= spend time away from your work/studies). This week, as …

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Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​ As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain. …

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