New words – 4 January 2021

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vaccine stamp noun [C]
/ˈvæk.siːn.stæmp/
a mark made in a passport to show that the holder has been vaccinated against the covid-19 virus

The new “vaccine stamps” would allow tourists to avoid being held up at borders if the international travel industry starts to pick up in the middle of next year as the pandemic subsides. The stamps are being considered by ministers at the Department for Transport (DfT) as a significant way to boost the aviation industry by giving a degree of certainty to travellers planning overseas holidays next summer.
[telegraph.co.uk, 29 November 2020]

Blursday noun [C]
UK /ˈblɜːz.deɪ/ US /ˈblɝːz.deɪ/
a humorous way of referring to any day of the week in the time of the covid-19 pandemic, from the fact that it is sometimes difficult to know which day it is

Blursday is a term that’s being tossed around on social media right now to describe the merging of minutes, hours and days since COVID-19 shut so much of the world down … Days, at least for the last couple months, have been flowing into each other with no line delineating one from the other. … Blursday posts might be funny on Facebook, but Blursday is a dangerous space for many people.
[lunarecovery.com, May 2020]

V-Day noun [S]
/ˈviː.deɪ/
the day when the vaccination programme against the covid-19 virus was launched in the UK

A 90-year-old woman has become the first person to receive an approved Covid-19 vaccine in the western world—the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine approved last week for emergency use in the U.K.—as the nation’s National Health Service (NHS) embarks on “V-Day,” a term ministers are using to describe the biggest immunization campaign in the organization’s history.
[forbes.com, 8 December 2020]

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