New words – 15 July 2019

Kenneth_Keifer / iStock / Getty Images Plus

agritecture noun [U]
UK /ˈæg.riˌtek.tʃəʳ/ US /ˈæg.rə.tek.tʃɚ/
the art and practice of designing and making buildings that are inspired by farm buildings, or this architectural style

Architects are not only converting period barns; they are being asked to design contemporary homes that echo grain silos and storage units clad in undulating tin. The rise of agritecture can be attributed to a rebellion against showy homes. While much of the architecture world wants to go bigger, shinier and more tricksy, some practices are heading in the other direction, where restraint and modesty lead to a home blending in with its location.
[The Times, 6 April 2018]

landscraper noun [C]
UK /ˈlændˌskreɪ.pəʳ/ US /ˈlændˌskreɪ.pɚ/
a very large building that takes up a lot of space on the land

KONE Corporation, a global leader in the elevator and escalator industry, has won an order to equip Google’s new UK headquarters building, KGX1. The 11-story-tall and 312-meter-long “landscraper” will run parallel to the platforms of London’s King’s Cross railway station in England and will sit at the heart of a campus for 7,000 Google employees.
[news.cision.com, 6 March 2019]

superblock noun [C]
UK /ˈsuː.pə.blɒk/ US /ˈsuː.pɚ.blɑːk/
a space in a city made up of several blocks, where only local traffic is permitted and the needs of the people who live there are given priority

On Barcelona’s superblocks, local access for motor vehicles is still permitted, but through traffic is not. The streets are designed to make drivers feel like they are visitors, with narrow rights-of-way for cars. Almost all car traffic is local residents or people with personal business on the block. Without dangerous car traffic overrunning the streets, generating noise and pollution, superblocks are full of life.
[vimeo.com, 3 August 2018]

About new words

2 thoughts on “New words – 15 July 2019

  1. Robert F. Richter

    Please insert – after the defined word – a colon or other punctuation that separates it from words like “noun,” “verb,” adjective,” etc.

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