A royal wedding and an attempted murder: a look back at 2018 in the UK

Sean Gladwell/Moment/GettyImages

by Liz Walter

As 2018 draws to a close, I thought it would be interesting to look at just a few of the year’s major events. This post takes a UK perspective; my next one will cover events in the USA. I should make it clear that the purpose of this post is to focus on vocabulary – much as I might like to, I am not expressing any personal opinions about things that have happened!

Sergei Skripal poisoning: March saw a story worthy of a spy novel, when a Russian double agent and his visiting daughter were found half-dead from a nerve agent in the quiet English city of Salisbury. As a result, many Russian diplomats were expelled from Britain and several other countries.

Chaos on the railways: 2018 was a bad year for commuters. In the North of England, new timetables caused major disruption. Meanwhile, in the South, strikes led to frequent cancellations.

Harry and Meghan’s wedding: On a more cheerful note, May was the month of the royal wedding (marriage of a royal person) in which an American actress married the man who is currently 6th in line to the throne (would become king if the 5 people ahead of him died). The ceremony took place at Windsor Castle and was watched on TV by almost 30 million people.

Fracking: This year the government decided to allow fracking in the UK for the first time. They argue that shale gas will be a useful source of energy. Environmentalists disagree, and there has already been a series of small earthquakes in the area where fracking is taking place.

World Cup: In June and July, 31 national squads competed in football’s World Cup. Fans were impressed by the organisation of the host nation (country where a competition takes place), Russia. England reached the quarter-finals, and  – very unusually – won one of their games in a penalty shootout. The final was won by France.

Brexit: I couldn’t finish this post without mentioning the issue that’s been in the UK news all year – Brexit. After months of negotiations, the Prime Minister, Teresa May, has presented a deal. However, opposition parties (other political parties in parliament) say they will not support it, and several members of her own party have resigned in protest.

Well, that’s just six of the many things that have happened this year. I’m sure you can think of lots more!

8 thoughts on “A royal wedding and an attempted murder: a look back at 2018 in the UK

  1. srikanth

    Hi Liz ,
    Your stories and their connected verbs and idioms were well structured. Especially, in case of me , I have learnt many new verbs. I really thank you for your great cooperation in giving us new verbs and idioms.

  2. Maryem Salama

    I read on a web-page that prince Harry is the fourth in line to the throne and his cousin princess Beatrice of York is the sixth. Right? the counting starts after the Queen or rather starts with the recent heir Charles. Isn’t it? Thank you, Liz.

      1. IworshiptheLord

        Yeah that’s true !
        And thank you, Liz Walter, for this post ! I knew about Brexit, the royal wedding and of course the World Cup (we, French, have woooooon !!!!! :D), but I did’nt know about the others events !

  3. Dave

    The most important and impactful news this year here in Brazil was Bolsonaro’s win in the latest elections. So excited to see Brazil swung right and can at least stamp out corruption caused by the left. A new future is to flourish.

  4. Gloria Bailey

    I just recently found this site and I love it. Have always loved new words ! This site is exactly what I need. Thank you!

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