Egging on, storming out and making up: phrasal verbs connected with arguing (2).

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by Liz Walter

My last post looked at phrasal and prepositional verbs connected with starting arguments and what happens during arguments. Today I’ll start with describing other people’s involvement in an argument and then go on to talking about what happens when an argument is over.

Usually, the best thing to do when two people are arguing is to stay out of it (not become involved): My sisters are always arguing, but I try to stay out of it. However, there are times when you might feel you need to step in (try to deal with or stop the argument): I had to step in before they started punching one another. Some people, however, prefer to stir up (cause) arguments: He’s always trying to stir things up between Jamie and Rose.

If you side with one person in an argument, you agree with them and often try to support them: My parents always side with my little brother. If you feel that one person is being treated unfairly, you might stand up for or (slightly more informally) stick up for them: I tried to stick up for my colleague, but our boss wouldn’t listen.

And what happens at the end of an argument? Well, someone who is still very angry and has not reached an agreement might storm out or storm off (leave the room in an angry manner): He stormed out, slamming the door behind him.

However, another person might back down or give in (allow the other person to win the argument) either because they have been proved wrong, or because they do not want to continue the argument: She insisted on firing him and refused to back down. Eventually he gave in and agreed to their demands.

If an argument makes you very upset or angry, it may take some time to calm down afterwards: She was absolutely furious, and it took her days to calm down. However, if an argument is less serious, you may be able to shrug it off or laugh it off (show that you do not think it is important): Max was quite rude to Emma but she just shrugged it off. He laughed off their criticism and continued to do things his own way. You could always simply wait until the unpleasantness of an argument blows over (becomes less important and is then forgotten): I know she’s angry with you, but it will soon blow over.

When people become friendly again after an argument, they make up: We fell out a few times but we always managed to make up afterwards. People who make efforts to mend a relationship try to patch things up: Have you patched things up with Jamie yet? However, if a relationship cannot recover after an argument, it breaks down: Arguments about housework eventually caused their relationship to break down.

36 thoughts on “Egging on, storming out and making up: phrasal verbs connected with arguing (2).

  1. mohan kumar.k

    It’s superb .It’s very useful,at the same time very interesting also.keep giving such practical phrases,really we need it.

    1. Liz Walter

      Oh no! Well spotted! I meant to add that if you egg someone on, you encourage them to do a bad thing, for instance to fight someone.

  2. Venkat

    This blog has been wonderful and the the text of the matter has been seamless and flows in such a way that delights and enlightens the reader. In fact it stimulates the brain to cherish what it has assimilated. I would reiterate that it is a great job.
    Many Thanks.

  3. Shimeng An

    Hi, I came across your blog very recently but found it very useful for English learners of all levels. I’ve spent several days reading all your posts these years and recommended them to my friends and teachers.

    However, it’s very inconvenient when I want to review some of the words or phrases because I usually have to get to the bottom of your blog. So could you please sort out your articles in a book or something? Or do you have some recommendations of books similar to your posts?

    1. Liz Walter

      Yes, sorry, my mistake! Several commenters have spotted this: if you egg someone on, you encourage them to do a bad thing, for instance to fight someone.

  4. Ashian

    How come we don’t have word Oblivity in English? Derivative of Oblivious encompassing unawareness, forgetfulness and lack of consciousness and so on…….it makes perfect sense and sounds absolutely Anglical word…….kindly inform me of your opinion about my submission and its inclusion in the dictionary if and when you do? Thank you sir/madam.

    1. T lh

      I have to say that your comment is inspiring. It’s almost surreal to scroll down a random blog post and find a comment from a stranger coincindentally asking exactly the same random curiosity I have with the term “oblivity” although I was more interested in why obliviousness didn’t come to mind. Hm

  5. FARHANA MIR

    Thanks alot …..i literally like all ur posts😊😊😍

    On Wed, 5 Sep 2018, 4:33 pm About Words – Cambridge Dictionaries Online blog, wrote:

    > Liz Walter posted: ” by Liz Walter My last post looked at phrasal and > prepositional verbs connected with starting arguments and what happens > during arguments. Today I’ll start with describing other people’s > involvement in an argument and then go on to talking about wha” >

  6. Maryem Salama

    stay- step- stir- side-stick- stand… how the sound and the meaning of these words are beautifully combined and how genius this language is! I love it day after day. thank you, Liz

  7. Christine Mourice

    Thank you very much for this blog. I’m a learner of English and I learned a lot from your blog. You really explain phrases in an easy way. I liked your manner of writing. You wrote a blog like a small story, It’s really attracted me.

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