Posts Tagged ‘English’

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New words – 29 June 2015

June 29, 2015

burger

burger noun a menu on a computer screen comprising three short parallel horizontal lines which the user clicks to see options

Definitely use a burger. You could put the settings in the burger menu too. Fix the settings to the bottom of the burger menu and use a vertically scrolling contact list that scrolls behind the settings button.

[http://ux.stackexchange.com/ 14 November 2014]

flash sale noun an e-commerce business model in which a product is offered at a substantial discount for a very limited period. Potential takers register as members of the website and receive online offers.

Flash sale companies are growing fast. Evan Davis and guests discuss how this new retail sector is changing the way we shop.

[www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04lstkr 23 October 2014]

GAFA abbreviation the companies Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon, seen as one entity

But the spread of the term ‘GAFA’ may be as much to do with cultural resentment as taxes. ‘I think it’s more about distribution of power in the online world than tax avoidance,’ Liam Boogar, founder of the French start-up site, Rude Baguette, tells Quartz. France, after all, is a country with a long history of resisting US cultural hegemony.

[http://qz.com 01 December 2014]

About new words

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The cake was made by my sister: how to use the passive in English.

June 24, 2015

by Liz Walter​
passive_cake
Look at these two sentences:

My sister made the cake.

The cake was made by my sister.

Both these sentences mean the same. The first is an active sentence: it tells you what the sister did. The second is a passive sentence: it tells you what happened to the cake.

Here are some more passive sentences. Note that we use by before the person or thing that does something, and with before the thing that is used to do it:

‘Hamlet’ was written by Shakespeare.

The pieces of wood were cut by a machine.

The rope was cut with a sharp knife. Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 22 June 2015

June 22, 2015

nanobrewery

nanobrewery noun a brewery that produces beer in very small quantities, less than a microbrewery

Although East Dallas is no stranger to craft breweries, On Rotation is a little different than anything else we’ve seen before. It’s what could be described as a nano-brewery — bigger than a homebrewery, but smaller than a microbrewery.

[lakewood.advocatemag.com (online local news, Texas, US) 23 October 2014]

microplay noun a very short play

Rafe Spall stars in a microplay written by Roy Williams and directed by Clint Dyer after a conversation with Barney Ronay

[www.theguardian.com 24 November 2014]

small data noun data in manageable-sized chunks that can be easily understood

But, rather than simply getting caught up in the promises of big data, I want to employ the concept of ‘small data’ – the localised, contextual and manageable data that can help provide a fertile environment for the development of data analysis.

[www.cilip.org.uk/ci 02 December 2014]

About new words

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As fresh as a daisy: using similes in English.

June 17, 2015

by Liz Walter​
similes
There are two ways of forming similes. The first is with as … as:

The countryside here is as flat as a pancake.

I knew Polly was scared because she was as white as a sheet.

These similes have the structure: as + adjective + as a/an + noun.

We use them to emphasize the adjective. The examples above mean that the countryside is extremely flat, and Polly’s face was very pale.

Here are a few more very common similes:

as stubborn as a mule

as light as a feather

as different as chalk and cheese Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 15 June 2015

June 15, 2015

JOMO_2

JOMO abbreviation the joy of missing out

It was only a matter of time before someone – in this case Fake’s fellow entrepreneur Anil Dash – came up with a counterpart acronym, which encapsulates my stance towards tarot cabaret: Jomo, the joy of missing out.

[http://www.theguardian.com 17 October 2014]

 

inspo noun informal inspiration

An oversized fedora (leather band) is a) more chic, and b) less annoying for everyone else. See Naomi Watts for inspo.

[The Guardian (UK broadsheet) 29 November 2014]

obvi abbreviation obviously

Obvi she didn’t want to get in trouble, but wait! There’s more to it than that!

[http://perezhilton.com 10 December 2014]

Ugh: TIME Wants To Ban Girl-Centric Slang Words, And That’s Obvi A Problem

[www.huffingtonpost.com 14 November 2014]

About new words

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We don’t really get on. (Phrasal verbs for describing relationships)

June 10, 2015

by Kate Woodford​
relationships
Two people who have a good relationship are often said to get on (well): I get on really well with both of my brothers. Meanwhile, people who stop being friends after an argument are frequently said to fall out: The brothers fell out over money. Our relationships are very important to us so we talk about them a lot. Often, to describe the way we feel about a person, or something that has happened to a relationship, we use phrasal verbs such as these. This week, we are looking at the most important phrasal verbs in this area. Some are used for talking about romantic relationships and others relate to friends and family members. All are common.

Let’s start with the first time we meet another person. If we like them, we may say that we take to them and if, (as sometimes happens), we decide that we do not like them, we may say that we take against them: I hadn’t met Jamie’s girlfriend before but I really took to her – I thought she was lovely./Tom took against Rebecca because she said something mean about his friend. If we very much like someone that we have just met and become friendly immediately, we sometimes use the informal phrasal verb hit it off: I introduced Jake to Ollie and they really hit it off. (Notice that ‘it’ is always part of this phrase. This is true for a small group of phrasal verbs.) If one particular thing about a person you have just met makes you not like them, you may say that it puts you off them: Kate’s husband was very rude to our waiter and it put me off him a bit. Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 8 June 2015

June 8, 2015

athwear

athwear noun clothing designed for sport and exercise

Going down: referring to your ‘gym gear’ It’s ‘athwear’ now, and old T-shirts are most definitely not OK.

[The Guardian (UK broadsheet) 29 November 2014]

Shifts in lifestyle are also as important as catwalk trends, and the rise in status of workout clothing is reflected both in a new range of high-tech sports bras, and in “athwear” detailing in fashion ranges: a silky vest has mesh segments and white piping, while silky tracksuit bottoms are styled with high heels.

[http://www.fashionandstyle.org/ 19 November 2014]

lumbersexual noun a man who affects a hearty, outdoorsy style of dress

Boys, chuck out the moisturiser! It’s out with the ‘metrosexual’ and in with our latest crush the ‘lumbersexual’ (wood chopping skills not essential).

[www.dailymail.co.uk 14 November 2014]

waist training noun the deliberate narrowing of one’s waist, achieved by wearing a tight corset

Last week, Kim Kardashian Instagrammed yet another picture of herself in a corset with the caption: ‘Really obsessed with weight training.’

[Grazia (UK celebrity magazine) 24.11.14]

About new words

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