Posts Tagged ‘English’

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New words – 2 February 2015

February 2, 2015

bro-country

bro-country noun a sub-genre of country music sung by young white men, featuring songs with macho themes such as trucks, drinking, and partying

[A] celebration of […] life that features trucks, beer and scantily clad women as the must-have accessories. The young country duo Maddie & Tae aren’t fans of the third element in the ‘bro-country’ trinity.

[NPR: All Things Considered (news, politics and culture) 25 July 2014]

filk noun a genre of folk music that is inspired by science fiction

Nowt so queer as filk – world sci-fi festival beams into London

[The Guardian (UK broadsheet) 16 August 2014]

raptivist noun informal a rap artist who uses lyrics to try to create political change

The commercial success of ‘conscious’ rap artists along with the laziness of mainstream media helped to spawn the raptivist.

[http://www.funk-the-system.net/ 15 October 2014]

Raptivist Tef Poe helps fuel Ferguson protests.

[http://www.stlamerican.com/ (headline) 04 October 2014]

About new words

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Think long and hard; the language of decisions

January 28, 2015

by Liz Walter​
think_long_and_hard
One of the best ways (perhaps the best way) to improve your English is to learn how words go together in phrases, idioms, or other patterns such as verb/noun or adjective/noun pairs (often called ‘collocations’).

This blog looks at some useful phrases and collocations connected with the subject of decisions, something we often discuss.

Firstly, make is the verb most often used with decision, but we often say that we reach or come to a decision too, especially when we need to put a lot of thought into it (= think about it carefully).

If we have a difficult/tough decision to make, we will want to take time to consider the pros and cons/advantages and disadvantages of the possible choices (= the good and bad things about them). We will weigh them up (= decide which are most important) carefully. When there is more than one thing we could do in a situation, we have to consider our options. Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 19 January 2015

January 19, 2015

flowerbeard

flower beard noun a beard adorned with flowers

And some of said beard-rockers are even turning it up a notch, painting trend on top of trend with what’s come to be known as ‘the flower beard.’

[http://www.cbc.ca 21 July 2014]

 

 

gypset adjective relating to an ethnic, bohemian style

This Massimo Dutti handkerchief-print skirt taps into the modern gypset look that’s pounding the pavements.

[Grazia (UK celebrity magazine) 07 July 2014]

smasual adjective informal denotes a style that is at once smart and casual

Dress Down Friday: What is “Smasual”?

[http://globalyoungexecutive.com 21 July 2014]

About new words

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Something to look forward to: three-word phrasal verbs

January 14, 2015

by Liz Walter​
lookingforward
Most phrasal verbs are formed with a verb and a single particle, but a few have two particles. This blog looks at some of the most common ones.

You probably already know the one in the title: look forward to. One important thing to remember is that if you use another verb after it, it must be in the –ing form:

I’m really looking forward to seeing you. (= I’m pleased and excited because I am going to see you)

Here are some more common three-word phrasal verbs which are well worth learning: Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 12 January 2015

January 12, 2015

air_yoga

Air Yoga noun trademark a form of yoga in which poses are done while suspended in a type of sling

Now we can exclusively reveal the secret behind Kate’s hot new body – Air Yoga.

[Grazia (UK celebrity magazine) 25 August 2014]

 

 

high intensity training noun short bursts of very vigorous activity

High Intensity Training (HIT) has attracted a lot of attention for promising some of the same benefits as conventional exercise but in a much shorter time.

[www.bbc.co.uk 27 July 2014]

roller-skiing noun the sport of skiing on a hard surface such as a road using skis with wheels

But that’s where a former winter Olympian from Lithuania comes in. Mantas Strolia was the best cross-country skier in Lithuania for eight years running, but now he’s swapped the mountains for our (equally lovely) guided busway, to share his vast expertise with fellow thrill-seekers in Cambridge. How? Roller-skiing of course.

[Cambridge News (UK local newspaper) 05 Sept 2014]

Snowsport England [SSE] are running their next level 1 Roller Ski Instructor course at Hillingdon Cycle Circuit on 1-2 November
led by Adam Pinney.

[http://www.londonnordic.org.uk/ 21 August 2014]

About new words

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Party Talk (The language of party chat)

December 23, 2014

by Kate Woodford​​​​
partychat
With the party season in full swing (= at its busiest now), we consider the language of socializing (= enjoying yourself with other people). We’re looking especially at words and phrases which are used to describe the different ways that people behave at a party and the sort of conversations that party guests may have.

Some people are very sociable (= liking meeting people). For them, a party is an opportunity to meet and chat to many people. They may choose to mingle, moving around the room and talking to a lot of guests: I guess I’d better go and mingle with my guests.

Other guests may be meeting for the first time. They may just exchange pleasantries, meaning that they say things to each other which are polite and pleasant but not especially interesting or important: Sarah introduced us at her party and we exchanged pleasantries. Another way of saying this is to make small talk: He doesn’t especially enjoy making small talk with people he doesn’t know. The informal noun chit-chat is also used to refer to conversation about matters that are not important: I don’t even remember what we spoke about – I think it was just the usual party chit-chat. Read the rest of this entry ?

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Let’s celebrate! (words and phrases for parties)

December 17, 2014

by Kate Woodford​​​​
letscelebrate
With Christmas and New Year almost upon us, we thought it a good time to look at the language of parties and celebrations. First, let’s start with the word ‘party’ itself. To have or throw a party or, less commonly, to give a party is to arrange a party: We’re having a party to celebrate the end of the exams. If you provide the place where the party happens, often your home, you may be said to host the party: Rosie has offered to host the party at her place. A party for someone who is leaving a place or a company is often called a farewell party or a leaving party: We’re having a farewell party for a member of staff. An office party is a party for a company’s colleagues. Meanwhile, a party that you throw for a person who knows nothing about it in advance is a surprise party: It’s a surprise party so it’s all top secret.

A celebration is a party or other social event on a special day or occasion: There were lively New Year celebrations all over town. The verb celebrate is also used, meaning ‘to take part in a special social event’: We always celebrate our wedding anniversary by going out to dinner. If you celebrate in style, you celebrate in a place that is expensive and attractive: For those who like to celebrate in style, there are the castle function rooms. To mark the occasion means ‘to celebrate a particular event or day’: It’s not every day you turn twenty-one. I think we need to mark the occasion! Read the rest of this entry ?

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