Posts Tagged ‘English’

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New words – 24 November 2014

November 24, 2014

pedtext

ped-text verb to text someone while walking

I’m ped-texting, I’m looking down at my phone, 75 percent of the time.

[WNYC: Brian Lehrer Show (politics and current affairs) 15 April 2014]

 

 

kill switch noun a facility which renders a handset useless if it is stolen

Authorities have been urging tech firms to take steps to help curb phone theft and argued that a kill-switch feature can help resolve the problem.

[www.bbc.co.uk 20 June 2014]

beacon noun a device installed somewhere, usually a shop, that sends alerts to mobiles in the vicinity

If the writing was not on the wall already that the use of proximity-aware beacons was the future of retail, now we have some data to back it up.

[http://techcrunch.com 17 June 2014]

About new words

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New words – 17 November 2014

November 17, 2014

silversplicer

silver splicer noun informal a person who marries in later life

Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’
Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

[www.telegraph.co.uk 12 June 2014]

 

SBNR abbreviation spiritual but not religious; used especially on dating websites

A few minutes on Google revealed that SBNR is more than just an acronym. One in three Americans defined themselves as spiritual but not religious.

[http://www.bbc.co.uk/ 24 May 2014]

brotherzone noun informal a category of friendship where a man is like a brother to a woman, and therefore not a potential sexual partner

In my experience the ‘brotherzone’ is a lot more fun, when it’s short term/you have other female ‘friends’ cause 95 per cent of men will ‘slip-up’ before the girl. then [sic] they just end up looking sad and desperate.

[http://m.tickld.com/ 11 May 2014]

About new words

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New words – 10 November 2014

November 10, 2014

smartgun

smart gun noun a gun with various technologies, such as proximity sensors and biometrics, that are intended to improve gun safety

The so called ‘smart gun’ has recently been causing tension in both the EU and US firearms industries.

[www.bbc.co.uk 23 May 2014]

 

barrel bomb noun a type of improvised explosive device made from explosives packed into a barrel

Since the end of 2013, government forces have waged a deadly aerial campaign in the city using barrel bombs, allowing them to make several gains.

[www.bbc.co.uk 28 April 2014]

The Syrian air force has used so-called ‘barrel bombs’ dropped from aircraft to try to put down a rebellion against President Bashar al-Assad.

[www.bbc.co.uk 30 May 2014]

genericide noun the use of a brand name to mean a class of similar items and the consequent dilution of that brand name’s potency

Cue rival businesses, circling the exposed brand and swooping to attach its powerful name to their own products. And if they can convince intellectual property judges that they are entitled to use it because it’s now an everyday word, that trademark is dead and buried – the victim of ‘genericide’.

[www.bbc.co.uk (Simon Tulett) 28 May 2014]

About new words

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New words – 3 November 2014

November 3, 2014

usie

usie noun informal a self-taken photo of a group of people

Cute! Looks like Daddy Wiz put 3 chainzzz on his Handsome son, Sebastian, and snapped a quick usie.

[cantholdwater.com 03 April 2014]

 

 

Throwback Thursday noun slang a time for reminiscing (often used as a hashtag)

It’s #ThrowbackThursday (or #TBT if you prefer), which means RadarOnline.com is taking a look back to move forward on some of today’s hottest stories.

[radaronline.com 10 April 2014]

fave verb to mark a tweet as a favourite on Twitter (trademark)

The most popular reason for faving something? People simply liked the tweet.

[knowmore.washingtonpost.com 04 June 2014]

About new words

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New words – 27 October 2014

October 27, 2014

highfrequency trading

high-frequency trading noun a type of stock market trading that uses very complex technology to trade extremely quickly, often making tiny profits which nevertheless add up to substantial sums

Lewis’s book, Flash Boys, is driving a huge amount of attention toward the topic of high frequency trading, and it has rekindled some of [sic] basic arguments over its impact on markets and investors.

[http://www.businessweek.com/ 01 April 2014]

dark pool noun a private stock market, usually owned by a major financial institution

The dark pool is not required to report whatever happens to it in real time to the world outside of it.

[WNYC: Leonard Lopate Show (culture and information) 23 April 2014]

Nisa noun a new version of the ISA, a UK tax-free savings scheme

‘Nisa’ rules come into effect from July, but there is still confusion over the time limits for topping up fixed-rate cash Isas.

[www.telegraph.co.uk 12 May 2014]

About new words

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New words – 28 April 2014

April 28, 2014

robot_dog

evo devo robo noun evolutionary developmental robotics – robotic design drawing on biological development and natural selection

Most robots […] physical form remains fixed […] But it doesn’t have to be that way, say pioneers of ‘evo devo robo’.

[Smithsonian (US culture and science magazine) Dec. 2013]

neuromorphic adjective able to behave like or copy the behavior of the biological synapses of the human brain

I.B.M. and Qualcomm, as well as the Stanford research team, have already designed neuromorphic processors, and Qualcomm has said it is coming out in 2014 with a commercial version.

[New York Times (US broadsheet) 29 December 2013]

hutch up phrasal verb to move in with someone else at an early stage in a relationship

Young Londoners ‘hutch up’ to curb rental costs

[www.ft.com 19 November 2013]

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Not much between the ears: how to say that someone is stupid

April 16, 2014

by Liz Walter
stupid
There are many different ways of saying that someone is stupid, depending on factors such as who you are talking to, whether or not you care about offending someone, or how serious you are being.

We can describe someone who has trouble understanding things as slow or dim, but note that we almost always put words like a bit or rather in front of these words: Her husband’s a bit dim. My pupils were rather slow. A kinder way of describing a student who isn’t doing well is to use the verb struggle: My daughter struggles with maths. She’s struggling at school.

At a more advanced level, someone with a vacuous expression has little sign of intelligence in their face, while an inane remark is silly and has no real meaning.

In English, it is common to express critical ideas by using positive words in negative sentences. We say things such as: He’s not that bright. She’s not the sharpest pupil I’ve ever taught. They are the less intelligent ones. Read the rest of this entry ?

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