Posts Tagged ‘English’

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We don’t really get on. (Phrasal verbs for describing relationships)

June 10, 2015

by Kate Woodford​
relationships
Two people who have a good relationship are often said to get on (well): I get on really well with both of my brothers. Meanwhile, people who stop being friends after an argument are frequently said to fall out: The brothers fell out over money. Our relationships are very important to us so we talk about them a lot. Often, to describe the way we feel about a person, or something that has happened to a relationship, we use phrasal verbs such as these. This week, we are looking at the most important phrasal verbs in this area. Some are used for talking about romantic relationships and others relate to friends and family members. All are common.

Let’s start with the first time we meet another person. If we like them, we may say that we take to them and if, (as sometimes happens), we decide that we do not like them, we may say that we take against them: I hadn’t met Jamie’s girlfriend before but I really took to her – I thought she was lovely./Tom took against Rebecca because she said something mean about his friend. If we very much like someone that we have just met and become friendly immediately, we sometimes use the informal phrasal verb hit it off: I introduced Jake to Ollie and they really hit it off. (Notice that ‘it’ is always part of this phrase. This is true for a small group of phrasal verbs.) If one particular thing about a person you have just met makes you not like them, you may say that it puts you off them: Kate’s husband was very rude to our waiter and it put me off him a bit. Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 8 June 2015

June 8, 2015

athwear

athwear noun clothing designed for sport and exercise

Going down: referring to your ‘gym gear’ It’s ‘athwear’ now, and old T-shirts are most definitely not OK.

[The Guardian (UK broadsheet) 29 November 2014]

Shifts in lifestyle are also as important as catwalk trends, and the rise in status of workout clothing is reflected both in a new range of high-tech sports bras, and in “athwear” detailing in fashion ranges: a silky vest has mesh segments and white piping, while silky tracksuit bottoms are styled with high heels.

[http://www.fashionandstyle.org/ 19 November 2014]

lumbersexual noun a man who affects a hearty, outdoorsy style of dress

Boys, chuck out the moisturiser! It’s out with the ‘metrosexual’ and in with our latest crush the ‘lumbersexual’ (wood chopping skills not essential).

[www.dailymail.co.uk 14 November 2014]

waist training noun the deliberate narrowing of one’s waist, achieved by wearing a tight corset

Last week, Kim Kardashian Instagrammed yet another picture of herself in a corset with the caption: ‘Really obsessed with weight training.’

[Grazia (UK celebrity magazine) 24.11.14]

About new words

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New words – 1 June 2015

June 1, 2015

ebolaphobia

ebolaphobia noun irrational fear of the (spread of) the Ebola virus

Ebolaphobia Going Viral

[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ 30 October 2014]

Doctors Combat ‘Ebolaphobia’ With Facts as Antidote to Fear

[http://abcnews.go.com/ 22 October 2014]

 

bibliotherapist noun a therapist who uses books to facilitate better mental health

Walker is a bibliotherapist working for Kirklees Libraries and Information Services.

[http://www.cilip.org.uk 17 December 2014]

social prescribing noun in general practice, a more holistic approach to treating a patient with multiple issues in which the doctor puts the patient
in touch with organizations/charities, etc. who will address their problems

So-called ‘social prescribing’, where patients are referred to voluntary bodies or community groups for help, is already used
in the district.

[http://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk 14 October 2014]

About new words

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New words – 25 May 2015

May 25, 2015

ancestral_health

ancestral health noun diet based on the presumed diet of our Palaeolithic ancestors

‘Ancestral health,’ to use a term popular among Paleo followers, has gone mass.

[New York Times (US broadsheet) 21 September 2014]

Which is odd, because in many ways my husband has the instincts of a wild boar, and Ancestral Health – the lifestyle extension of the Paleo or ‘Caveman’ diet – is about going way back to a time of elk-jerky-eating, loincloth-wearing Lascaux dwellers.

[www.telegraph.co.uk 17 October 2014]

golden rice noun a genetically engineered form of rice with enhanced levels of vitamin A

Golden rice, as it is called, is meant to combat vitamin A deficiency, a huge problem in developing countries in Asia and Africa. Vitamin A deficiencies affect children and pregnant women who suffer everything from blindness to infections to death.

[www.thestarphoenix.com/ 07 October 2014]

hamburger tax noun a tax on unhealthy food

Poll: Do you think there should be a ‘hamburger tax’ on fatty and sugary foods?

[www.expressandstar.com 02 October 2014]

About new words

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New words – 18 May 2015

May 18, 2015

plyscraper

plyscraper noun a skyscraper made mainly from wood

The development of engineered timber could herald a new era of eco-friendly ‘plyscrapers’. Christchurch welcomed its first multistorey timber structure this year, there are plans for Vancouver, and the talk is China could follow

[www.theguardian.com 03 October 2014]

 

FOG abbreviation fat, oil and grease as poured down the drains in domestic households. It wreaks havoc in the sewers.

Customers pre-ordering a turkey from selected stores will receive free gadgets to help collect the fat, oil and grease (FOG) from their Christmas roast.

[http://www.ipswichstar.co.uk 03 December 2014]

fugitive emissions plural noun a gas or other product that escapes during a process such as drilling

Cornell environmental engineering professor Anthony Ingraffea […] found newer [gas and oil] wells using fracking and horizontal drilling methods were far more likely to be responsible for fugitive emissions of methane.

[www.desmogblog.com (website dedicated to climate science) 17 October 2014]

About new words

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You remind me of someone… (Words for remembering)

May 13, 2015

by Kate Woodford​​​​
remembering
Do you have a good memory? Is your memory so good, it’s photographic, allowing you to remember precise things in exact detail? Perhaps your memory is good at particular things. You might have a good memory for faces or a good memory for names. Or you may not be so lucky. You might be forgetful, (often forgetting things). Worse, you may have a memory/mind like a sieve. (A sieve is a piece of kitchen equipment with a lot of little holes in it!) Whether your memory is good or bad, you will find yourself using words and phrases to describe the process of remembering. This post aims to increase your word power in this area.

Let’s start with useful words and phrases for remembering. Two other ways of saying ‘remember’ are recall and recollect: I seem to recall she was staying with Rachel./I don’t recollect her precise words. If you cast your mind back, you make an effort to think about something from the past: Cast your mind back to that evening we spent with her. Do you remember how sad she seemed? If you succeed in remembering something, you might say you bring or call it to mind: I remember that name, I just can’t call his face to mind. If something – for example a name – rings a bell, it sounds familiar to you, but you can’t remember quite why: The name rang a bell, but I couldn’t remember where I’d heard it. Read the rest of this entry ?

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New words – 11 May 2015

May 11, 2015

mint

mint adjective (informal) nice; cool

Either way, the car looks mint.

[Stuff (UK innovations magazine) Nov 2014]

 

 

 

 

bae noun (slang) a romantic partner (often used as a form of address)

I have to kill my bae because he is CHEATING ON ME.

[www.youtube.com 13 November 2014]

See ya, bae!

[Heard in conversation (young girl, early teens) 15 December 2014]

neg verb (informal) to insult someone in order to attract theme sexually

I watched JBU this week and nearly choked on my drink when you talked about negging guys to pick them up. Just had to share.

[gabydunn.com 05 November 2014]

About new words

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